16 09

There’s a sludge filled lake with innumerable tubes pumping black waste into its murky waters 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Much of the black coloration comes from the coal residue falling from the sky. If you look around this distopian wasteland, you’ll see the smokestacks of coal power plants in every direction. This is the heart of Mongolia, and China’s dominance of the rare Earth minerals market has transformed sleepy towns into booming centers of mining and refining, but also waste.

An article by the BBC speculates, “It could be argued that China’s dominance of the rare earth market is less about geology and far more about the country’s willingness to take an environmental hit that other nations shy away from.”

screen-shot-2016-09-16-at-10-17-39-am

You might ask yourself, “why do should I care?” Well, the answer is, if you have an i-phone, TV or computer you’re involved in the supply and demand chain for one of the ‘dirtiest’ businesses on earth.

To read the full BBC article, The Worst Place On Earth, click here.

 

Signup for our curated weekly newsletter to discover affordable, fun and rewarding solutions for thriving in wild times.

Signup for our curated weekly newsletter to discover affordable, fun and rewarding solutions for thriving in wild times.