About backup

Subtitle
About Me

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Digital nomads are a type of people who use telecommunications technologies to earn a living and, more generally, conduct their life in a nomadic manner. Such workers often work remotely from foreign countries, coffee shops, public libraries, co-working spaces, or recreational vehicles. This is often accomplished through the use of devices that have wireless Internet capabilities such as smartphones or mobile hotspots. Successful digital nomads typically have a financial cushion. The digital nomad community has had various events.

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How I Start Planning My Trip

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Visit the Forum

Get answers from fellow
nomads

Explore Destinations

Get travel tips & suggestions
by country

Get Travel Insurance

Stay protected during your adventures

Book a Flight

Find the best deals and the cheapest days to fly

Book a Hotel Now

Find cheap accommodations around the world
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A Timeline of My Travels

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Welcome to Korduroy.TV

Welcome to all things Korduroy.TV. This blog will be updated with plenty of cool stuff and other junk we think is important. Korduroy.TV was born from a disillusionment with our culture of mass production. From ocean swells to mountains and…

Interview With Surf Filmmaker Nathan Oldfield

Questions via Ryan Tatar

Bio:

Nathan Oldfield is a husband, father, surfer, shaper, filmmaker, photographer, writer, school teacher, bonsai enthusiast, sea gazer, rock collector from the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia. He is interested in documenting beautiful things and making stuff

Interview:

Your latest film, Seaworthy, was a great work of beautiful surf footage and fresh music.  What’s it like to make a surf film and how fruitful are the rewards of your efforts after the film has been screened and released on DVD?

Making a surf film seems romantic, but it’s actually a lot of hard work, especially when you do it all independently. It’s much more than just standing on the beach shooting, it’s the endless hours of actually conceiving something and putting it all together over a sustained period of time. Seaworthyis an entirely self-made and self-funded work. I have a few friends who sometimes help me shoot the double angle, but other than that I do everything by myself: shooting, editing, writing, music acquisition, packaging, production, promotion. It can get a little overwhelming at times, because making a surf film all on your own is a massive undertaking. Once it’s all done, there are rewards, but the rewards aren’t especially financial. I mean I could have made a lot more money spending all those thousands of hours doing something much more lucrative. But making money was never my motivation for making surf films. In lots of ways, making films is like making my own surfboards. It’s just part of who I am as a surfer, it’s just an extension of my surfing life, rather than a conscious decision or whatever. And like making my own boards from start to finish, you know – shaping, glassing, fin-making, the whole deal – making my own films is similar, I do the whole thing. So it’s a very satisfying process. It fulfills a very real need that I have to make stuff.

A lot of filmmakers have been showing a lot of alaia riding lately in their films.  Do you think alaias will ever really catch on because of their difficulty, or will they remain a niche in surfboard manufacturing?

Interview With Surf Filmmaker Ryan Thomas

Questions by Ryan Tatar

Bio:

Surfer, Ryan Thomas spent much of the ’90s drifting back and forth between his native Southern California as a freelance artist in the surf industry, and extended escapes to Northern Cal for the study of marine biology. In 1998 he picked up a super-8mm film camera from surf cinematographer, Greg Weaver (Forgotten Island of Santosha, Stylemasters), and soon finished the mysto road/art/surf film Scratch Miscellaneous (2000). He graduated from Art Center College of Design in 2001, and since then has directed surf films such as The Bruce Movie (2005) while becoming a key creative at Volcom’s Veeco Productions. RT’s filmmaking extends beyond the surf/skate/snow genres with his independently made music docs such as Concentration Face (2005) and Portals (2007)about the band Hella. And he continues to work in still photography and the other art mediums he formed his roots in prior to filmmaking.

Interview

What is your favorite artistic medium (ie, film, photography, dancing, etc) for your creative work around surfing. Which endeavor best conveys the stoke for you?

I don’t really have a single favorite. My roots are in drawing, graphic art, still photography, writing and music, which moved towards film as a place to combine it all. And since a film is made over a period of time, I enjoy doing the rest as a more immediate creative outlet along the way. Whether it reads in the work or not, they all inform each other in the creative process.

As Scratch Miscellaneous was filmed on super 8mm film, do you think (specifically in motion picture filmmaking) that new technologies in video can capture the essence of surfing as much as film?

That question can be easily answered in one word: Litmus. As far as I can tell, it wasn’t made on film emulsion, and it was a huge head change for countless surfers. Hydrodynamica is primarily being shot on video and even the low-res rough cut edits on the Hydro blog are essential viewing. I’m pretty sure The Tyler Warren Experiments and Displacementare being shot primarily on video and I’m excited to see those films too. I love the look of super-8 and 16mm, but the essence isn’t in any camera type or emulsion, it’s in what the camera is being pointed at and the choices the cameraman is making, coupled with the editing. Surfing is motion, so any medium that captures or even freezes motion has the potential to portray the essence.

Describe the differences you see in the two mediums besides personal preference?

Subtitle
Some Fun Facts About Me

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  • I have a journalism degree under my belt, which I hope to one day use to rid the world of bad grammar and “there, their, they’re” confusion.
  • I also have a master’s degree in hospitality and tourism management.
  • Contrary to popular belief, I do not travel full-time. I like to consider myself to be mildly adventurous and open to new things.
Subtitle
A Timeline of My Travels

Some description text for this item

Welcome to Korduroy.TV

Welcome to all things Korduroy.TV. This blog will be updated with plenty of cool stuff and other junk we think is important. Korduroy.TV was born from a disillusionment with our culture of mass production. From ocean swells to mountains and…

Interview With Surf Filmmaker Nathan Oldfield

Questions via Ryan Tatar

Bio:

Nathan Oldfield is a husband, father, surfer, shaper, filmmaker, photographer, writer, school teacher, bonsai enthusiast, sea gazer, rock collector from the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia. He is interested in documenting beautiful things and making stuff

Interview:

Your latest film, Seaworthy, was a great work of beautiful surf footage and fresh music.  What’s it like to make a surf film and how fruitful are the rewards of your efforts after the film has been screened and released on DVD?

Making a surf film seems romantic, but it’s actually a lot of hard work, especially when you do it all independently. It’s much more than just standing on the beach shooting, it’s the endless hours of actually conceiving something and putting it all together over a sustained period of time. Seaworthyis an entirely self-made and self-funded work. I have a few friends who sometimes help me shoot the double angle, but other than that I do everything by myself: shooting, editing, writing, music acquisition, packaging, production, promotion. It can get a little overwhelming at times, because making a surf film all on your own is a massive undertaking. Once it’s all done, there are rewards, but the rewards aren’t especially financial. I mean I could have made a lot more money spending all those thousands of hours doing something much more lucrative. But making money was never my motivation for making surf films. In lots of ways, making films is like making my own surfboards. It’s just part of who I am as a surfer, it’s just an extension of my surfing life, rather than a conscious decision or whatever. And like making my own boards from start to finish, you know – shaping, glassing, fin-making, the whole deal – making my own films is similar, I do the whole thing. So it’s a very satisfying process. It fulfills a very real need that I have to make stuff.

A lot of filmmakers have been showing a lot of alaia riding lately in their films.  Do you think alaias will ever really catch on because of their difficulty, or will they remain a niche in surfboard manufacturing?

Interview With Surf Filmmaker Ryan Thomas

Questions by Ryan Tatar

Bio:

Surfer, Ryan Thomas spent much of the ’90s drifting back and forth between his native Southern California as a freelance artist in the surf industry, and extended escapes to Northern Cal for the study of marine biology. In 1998 he picked up a super-8mm film camera from surf cinematographer, Greg Weaver (Forgotten Island of Santosha, Stylemasters), and soon finished the mysto road/art/surf film Scratch Miscellaneous (2000). He graduated from Art Center College of Design in 2001, and since then has directed surf films such as The Bruce Movie (2005) while becoming a key creative at Volcom’s Veeco Productions. RT’s filmmaking extends beyond the surf/skate/snow genres with his independently made music docs such as Concentration Face (2005) and Portals (2007)about the band Hella. And he continues to work in still photography and the other art mediums he formed his roots in prior to filmmaking.

Interview

What is your favorite artistic medium (ie, film, photography, dancing, etc) for your creative work around surfing. Which endeavor best conveys the stoke for you?

I don’t really have a single favorite. My roots are in drawing, graphic art, still photography, writing and music, which moved towards film as a place to combine it all. And since a film is made over a period of time, I enjoy doing the rest as a more immediate creative outlet along the way. Whether it reads in the work or not, they all inform each other in the creative process.

As Scratch Miscellaneous was filmed on super 8mm film, do you think (specifically in motion picture filmmaking) that new technologies in video can capture the essence of surfing as much as film?

That question can be easily answered in one word: Litmus. As far as I can tell, it wasn’t made on film emulsion, and it was a huge head change for countless surfers. Hydrodynamica is primarily being shot on video and even the low-res rough cut edits on the Hydro blog are essential viewing. I’m pretty sure The Tyler Warren Experiments and Displacementare being shot primarily on video and I’m excited to see those films too. I love the look of super-8 and 16mm, but the essence isn’t in any camera type or emulsion, it’s in what the camera is being pointed at and the choices the cameraman is making, coupled with the editing. Surfing is motion, so any medium that captures or even freezes motion has the potential to portray the essence.

Describe the differences you see in the two mediums besides personal preference?

Subtitle
Some Fun Facts About Me

Some description text for this item

  • I have a journalism degree under my belt, which I hope to one day use to rid the world of bad grammar and “there, their, they’re” confusion.
  • I also have a master’s degree in hospitality and tourism management.
  • Contrary to popular belief, I do not travel full-time. I like to consider myself to be mildly adventurous and open to new things.
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Featured Podcast

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Audio Interview with Jack Coleman

After seeing the Secret Sound Underground premiere at La Paloma in Encinitas, CA, a couple weeks back, it became clear to me that Jack Coleman has something to say to the surf industry. It might be easy to dismiss his…

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est. 2009

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Sage Stoneman

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